Midnight Project.

Hey folks, it’s been a while, I know, sorry about that!

Recently my work for the Charlatan has been mostly shooting hockey and Basketball, and nothing really impressive came out in the past few days, so I got lazy and didn’t post for a while.

The only significant thing that happened and I’m not sure I told you guys was that I bought a 24-70mm f/2.8, which is the most sweet lens I’ve ever had. I never leaves my camera, the 2.8 aperture gives me enough light to go about in almost any situation, and it’s a very fast and sharp lens. The files straight out of camera just look beautiful, I’ve rather use the 24-70mm and a higher ISO than put my 50mm 1.8 on…

Today, out of a moment of boredom, I decided to put my new photo acquisitions to use and create a mini studio in my room. I bought two oldSB-80dx flashes for cheap online. The flashes are just great and they have a built in slave, so I just put them on manual and fire away!

So I had this idea for a while now to take photos of some miniatures I have laying around my room, and decided it was the time. got the 2 flashes, a white piece of paper, and started shooting tiny portraits, with a tiny setup. Since I do not own a macro lens, I just used my 24-70mm that focus at a really close range (and since I use a DX camera, it acts like a 105mm at the telephoto end).

Coke Miniature of brazilian soccer player Juninho

The main challenge was to get a shallow depth of field because with so tiny subjects, the flashes acted like huge strobe lights, and still at 1/128th of power and f/11 it was still bright.

I won't confirm or deny that I painted a Hitler like moustache in Dunga's face after the world cup...

It’s amazing to work with miniatures though, because well, they are not real! They don’t get impatient, they keep the same facial expression, they can stand there literally forever, and they can be posed and move around at your will!

Although they look pretty much the same, it was a valid experiment, and kept the photo juices flowing.

A random medieval miniature

And if you’re wondering, here’s the setup I used:

The main light on the miniature’s face was quite harsh, so I just threw my umbrella over it to difuse a little, it worked wonders!

And that’s it folks, next weekend the newspaper will be sending me to CIS in halifax, so I’ll probably get back to you with all sorts of cool shots.

Pedro, out!

-30-

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Balloons and Portraits

Hello everybody! I know it’s been over a month, and I’m sorry. School finally started to press on, and only now I had a less packed week to relax and post.

But let’s get to the point, the reason why you keep coming here, I hope, the photographs.

The most fun I had this month was whilst shooting a Carleton Student that flies hot air balloons, the guy is funny and easygoing, and to shoot this assignment was a blast. In fact, I got cover of the paper with the shot below.

Shawn Glover inside his hot air balloon.

The balloon in the skies

Other than that I’ve been putting the umbrella to good use, taking several portraits, both for the Charlatan, and for myself. One of those was the portrait of Ottawa’s Mayor Jim Watson!

Benjamin is a doctorate student at Carleton

Ottawa's Mayor Jim Watson in his office.

Melanie Moller, modelling for a portrait

My brother, Luis, in his safari outfit.

And that’s it. I also took several sports photos on the past month, but those will have a stand alone post.

Party Time? Camera Time!

I love to take my camera to parties. My friends learned to accept it, if there’s a party, I’ll be there with my D90in one hand and a beer bottle in the other. Parties are usually great (if yours is not, there is something wrong), but parties for a photographer are even more great, is like a photographic buffet, salad included.

Parties are a great opportunity for photographers because I’m a better photographer when I’m drunk of two main factors, alcohol and the large number of things going on at the same time.

 

1 – Alcohol.

The only thing better than alcohol is colorful alcohol

Alcohol may get you numb, make you do stupid things, but above all what most insecure teenagers learn at age 14, alcohol creates extroversion where before stood shyness. Everyone knows the story, the shy quiet girl that after two margaritas start dancing salsa on the table, or the quiet guy that after three beers doesn’t stop talking for nothing on the world.

And that almost magic feature of alcohol is what makes it great for party photography, for there’s way less camera shyness and awkwardness on your subject if he’s at least tipsy. For beginners like me who doesn’t know exactly what to say or do to relax a subject, this is an amazing asset (and no, I’m not suggesting that you get every model drunk before a shoot, although I’ve seen better photographers recommend to offer a drink to non-professional models before shoots).

Alcohol, in my experience, leads to more natural portraits.

 

2 – Stuff happening everywhere, all the time.

So much stuff going on!

Loud, messy, people going back and forth, this characteristic of parties is amazingly helpful for the photographer who wants to take candid shots. People tend to ignore or simply not notice when you take a photo, they are way do busy doing other stuff like talking or drinking. Also, interesting stuff happens in parties all the time, either the guy passed out on the floor in the middle of the kitchen, or the group of people singing songs with a guitar on the basement.

 

On the top of those two main factors, there is the fact that people are generally loose on parties, even without alcohol. They are there to have a good time, and socialize, so the photos you take on parties usually reflect a joyful aspect of people’s lives that they are not used to, and they enjoy it.

So next time you’re invited to a party, take your camera with you, and wait for the right moment, sometimes you’ll get that perfect shot, out of a friend’s reunion.

You can almost feel the good time they're having.

Film Photography – the first photos.

And I’ve already developed my first 5 photos taken with the Minolta x700. I was just finishing the exposures on the film that was on the camera when it was given to me, that’s why only 5.

However I think I messed up in the development. I left the film to be developed as a B&W in the lab last week. Today looking for the film online, I find out that the film was the KODAK 400 CN, that is a special film made to be developed with C-41 instead.

So yeah, those are photos taken with a special B&W film made to be developed as C-41, and then developed as B&W. They were all taken before I actually understood the camera, or what was I doing. Tomorrow the first roll of color film will be ready, so stay tuned for more experiences.

For now, 4 fails and 1 win.

P.S. I did not have them printed, just the negatives developed, then scanned on a Kodak photo scanner.